Academy Academy Description ADEK Rating Curricula Location
Al Ain Academy

Primary & Secondary, Mixed

Very Good With Outstanding FeaturesEnglish National CurriculumAl Ain
Al Bateen Academy

Secondary, Mixed

OutstandingEnglish National Curriculum,IB Diploma ProgrammeAbu Dhabi
Al Mamoura Academy

Primary Mixed / Secondary Girls Only

Good With Very Good Features English National CurriculumAbu Dhabi
Al Muna Academy

Primary, Mixed

OutstandingEnglish National CurriculumAbu Dhabi
Al Yasmina Academy

Primary & Secondary, Mixed

Very Good With Outstanding FeaturesEnglish National CurriculumAbu Dhabi
The Pearl Academy

Primary, Mixed

Very Good With Outstanding FeaturesEnglish National CurriculumAbu Dhabi
West Yas Academy

Primary Mixed / Secondary Segregated 

GoodAmerican Massachusetts State CurriculumAbu Dhabi
Al Forsan Nursery

Nursery Mixed

Not ApplicableEnglish National CurriculumAbu Dhabi
Curricula

History education can help students gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of the past and that major events that shape people’s lives in the UK and the wider world. The curriculum should inspire students’ curiosity to know more about the past. Teaching should equip students to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement. History helps students to understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity and the challenges of their time. The national curriculum for history aims to ensure that all students:

  • know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day: how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world
  • know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristic features of past non-European societies; achievements and follies of mankind
  • gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’, ‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry’
  • understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses
  • understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed
  • gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales.

At Key Stage Three, students should extend and deepen their chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, UAE and world history, so that it provides a well-informed context for wider learning. students should identify significant events, make connections, draw contrasts, and analyse trends within periods and over long arcs of time. They should use historical terms and concepts in increasingly sophisticated ways. They should pursue historically valid enquiries including some they have framed themselves, and create relevant, structured and evidentially supported accounts in response. They should understand how different types of historical sources are used rigorously to make historical claims and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed.

In planning to ensure the progression described above through teaching the British, UAE and world history outlined below, teachers will combine overview and depth studies to help students understand both the long arc of development and the complexity of specific aspects of the content.

students should be taught about:

  • Medieval Britain 1066-1509
  • Britain 1509-1745
  • Britain, 1745-1901
  • Challenges for Britain, Europe and the wider world 1901 to the present day.